Something like love

LA Review

Posted in Commercial, Exhibit, Fine Art, Fine art, Lecture, Museum, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on January 14, 2011

With much excitement, Photo LA and Review LA have arrived!  Los Angeles, time to get excited about photography.  Expected highlights include the Uta Barth, David Taylor, and Andrew Moore lectures, all on that Saturday or Sunday.

I’m extremely excited to be participating in Review LA; I’ve already perused the list of participating photographers.  Other photographers to pay particular attention to include Amy Eckert, Irina Rozovsky (featured in an earlier post), Jessamyn Lovell, Kathleen Laraid McLaughlin, Lisa McCord and Steve Davis.

Kathleen Laraia McLaughlin, Photographer

[Photo by Kathleen Laraia McLaughlin]

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William Eggleston at the LACMA

Posted in Uncategorized by linhdy on January 2, 2011

As part of my full-photo immersion, I finally made the trip to the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art to visit the William Eggleston exhibition.  The wonderfully, mundane, color photographs are inspirational.  The sheer size and scale of the exhibit is particularly impressive.  It ranged from his earlier black and white photographs (which capture his early aesthetic style) to his more recent  Paramount Studios project in Los Angeles.

The exhibition contains a fair share of some classic work, some famous work, and some lesser known works!  His mastery of the dye-transfer process to completely highlight the everyday vernacular is eloquent and unexpected.   I was incredibly impressed with his ability to draw the audience in with his off-centered, diagonal frames– but we still understood his vision.  I’m so jealous of his hardcore formalism and eye for design.  The core of his work captured an often overlooked humor surrounding American southern culture.

One interesting tidbit includes how Eggleston often asked for additional feedback editing his work.  For  him, the challenge was that he viewed all his photographs as equal, “I’ve also never had favorite pictures. Or subjects. I have this discipline of treating everything equally-I used to say ‘democratically.'”  It further emphasized how Eggleston has rose to the forefront of modern photography; through his photography, he praised the everyday and helped all of us look at our lives with a fresh perspective.

William Eggleston - Los Alamos

[William Eggleston, Los Alamos, Eggleston Trust]

Read Harmony Korine interview Eggleston at Interview Magazine or visit the Eggleston Trust.

Stephen Wilkes Lecture at PhotoNOLA

Posted in Commercial, Documentary, Fine Art, Fine art, Lecutre, Moving, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on December 24, 2010

Stephen Wilkes - Ellis Island

A few weeks ago, my boyfriend and I returned from PhotoNOLA at New Orleans where we  had the wonderful experience of hearing photographer Stephen Wilkes lecture, in the flesh.  The December 11th lecture was two hours long and focused on his personal work with glimpses of his from high school work up until his recent project on the BP Oil Spill.

The most critical moment in the lecture and (in some ways his career), was when he was serendipitously granted unlimited access to document the Ellis Island hospital complex, which housed ill immigrants from 1892 to 1954 on their way to the United States.  As he said, Wilkes was in the right place at the right time.

The abandoned hospital complex was left in all its haunting glory in a secluded section of the Island.  During that time, it was exposed to the natural elements and–most importantly– time.  Wilkes captured the beautiful decay of the rooms,  parallel to the heavy history of those who stayed and even died in within the hospital ward.   His photographs tell the story of those who suffered, lived, and died within those confines.  The photos hint at an unsettling, and sometimes light, side of humanity.

On a lighter note, his lecture segued to his Vanity Fair piece on the billion-dollar financial swindler Bernard Madoff (incredibly clever!), to his on-going documentation of China as an industrializing machine (both scary and admirable).

Wilkes ended on an uplifting note by sharing his photos document the BP oil spill.  At that moment, it became clear that he aims to use his work to drive change.  And that my friend, is incredibly inspirational.

[Photos by Stephen Wilkes, Ellis Island]

Photographer Dan Burn-Forti

Posted in Commercial, Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on December 15, 2010

Tweeted about him last week, not it’s time to show-off the best holiday photos from Dan Burn-Forti.  It’s so modern-day, Americana with a touch of spicy nostalgia and tongue-in-cheek quirkiness.

Dan Burn-Forti

[See his portfolio, full of commercial and personal projects]

Photographer Brice Bischoff

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Love, Photography, Pretty things, Shiny Objects by linhdy on December 7, 2010

What luck!  I’m off to vacation in New Orleans during PhotoNOLA and I simultaneously discover photographer Brice Bischoff‘s gorgeously rendered time-elapsed photography.  It helps that Bischoss has some Louisiana roots to set the mood; life could not get any better.

I’m crossing my fingers that my travel partner will surrender to my persistent pleas to participant in the Saturday art openings and maybe-just maybe-listen to the Stephen Wilkes lecture.

In the mean time, stare in wonderment at Bischoff’s Bronson Caves, a swirling haze of rainbows set amongst the earthly, cavernous wilderness.

Brice Bischoff Bronson Caves

[Photos by Brice Bischoff‘]

John Divola – Artist Lecture

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Lecutre, Photography, Relationships by linhdy on December 6, 2010

I was extremely excited to listen to the very influential photographer John Divola lecture on Sunday at the downtown Museum of Contemporary Art.  Despite the lack of ventilation in the stuffy Ahmanson Auditorium, Divola plowed through an hour-long lecture on his artwork dating from his humble beginnings as a graduate student at the University of Califorian in Los Angeles to his current work as he continues to teach photography at the University of California in Riverside.  He appeared very relaxed speaking in front the intimate crowd, no surprise coming from a professor.

The most interesting part of any artist lecture, is hearing and seeing the artist talk about their work and the evolution of their art as their thought process changes.  From Divola’s older work up until his most recent was very consistent in his exploration how humankind interacts with the natural environment and his constant exploration of the abandoned spaces, the spaces around him and man-made elements within the landscape.

Even to this day, I will still recall how my photography professor showed us his Isolated Houses series– we all looked on in silent.  Divola has an instinctual eye for light and how it shapes the subject matter, and to this day, I still believe his house series is one of his most beautiful for its play on light and color.

In Artificial Nature, Divola selects and exhibits found photographs of fake natural landscapes created for movies.  At first appearing natural and eerie, the movie sets are gorgeous.  Once the viewer takes a closer look and notices the movie set signs and the painted background, the whole gig is up.

john-divola-artificial-nature

Marina Abramovic – Pushing the Envelope of Performance

Posted in Fine Art, Identity, Moving, Portraiture, Relationships by linhdy on December 2, 2010

Marina Abramovicis what I would call a radical performance artist.  She has shaped performance art in ways that I will not even try to explain.  However, I will admit that I used to think performance art was annoying, obnoxious and incomprehendable but now Abramovic has helped me view this medium in a new (more positive) light.

marina-abramovic-kitchenI-homagetosaintterese

marina-abramovic-stromboli-pieta

marina abramovic the family ix

Read more at the Sean Kelly Gallery, learn about her In The Family project or read the New York Press.

 

Irina Rozovsky

Posted in Commercial, Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Photography, Portraiture, Pretty things by linhdy on December 1, 2010

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Photos by Irina Rozovsky

Ariana Papademteropoulos – Painting Stories

Posted in Uncategorized by linhdy on November 25, 2010

If there is one thing I have fallen in love with through the years it is the sense of fairy tale, stories and wonderment.  Painter Ariana Papademteropoulos’s paintings seem like a twisted photograph until the viewer goes closer– and the whole illusion falls apart as her brush strokes and water marks take center stage.

Ariana Papademteropoulos PaintingsView her blog or see her paintings at the Robert and Tilton Gallery in Los Angeles until December 18th.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Photography by linhdy on November 25, 2010

 

AKI INOMATA Why Not Hand Over a Shelter to Hermit Crabs[Aki Inomata, Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs, Ai Kowada Gallery]