Something like love

Stephen Wilkes Lecture at PhotoNOLA

Posted in Commercial, Documentary, Fine Art, Fine art, Lecutre, Moving, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on December 24, 2010

Stephen Wilkes - Ellis Island

A few weeks ago, my boyfriend and I returned from PhotoNOLA at New Orleans where we  had the wonderful experience of hearing photographer Stephen Wilkes lecture, in the flesh.  The December 11th lecture was two hours long and focused on his personal work with glimpses of his from high school work up until his recent project on the BP Oil Spill.

The most critical moment in the lecture and (in some ways his career), was when he was serendipitously granted unlimited access to document the Ellis Island hospital complex, which housed ill immigrants from 1892 to 1954 on their way to the United States.  As he said, Wilkes was in the right place at the right time.

The abandoned hospital complex was left in all its haunting glory in a secluded section of the Island.  During that time, it was exposed to the natural elements and–most importantly– time.  Wilkes captured the beautiful decay of the rooms,  parallel to the heavy history of those who stayed and even died in within the hospital ward.   His photographs tell the story of those who suffered, lived, and died within those confines.  The photos hint at an unsettling, and sometimes light, side of humanity.

On a lighter note, his lecture segued to his Vanity Fair piece on the billion-dollar financial swindler Bernard Madoff (incredibly clever!), to his on-going documentation of China as an industrializing machine (both scary and admirable).

Wilkes ended on an uplifting note by sharing his photos document the BP oil spill.  At that moment, it became clear that he aims to use his work to drive change.  And that my friend, is incredibly inspirational.

[Photos by Stephen Wilkes, Ellis Island]

Photographer Dan Burn-Forti

Posted in Commercial, Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on December 15, 2010

Tweeted about him last week, not it’s time to show-off the best holiday photos from Dan Burn-Forti.  It’s so modern-day, Americana with a touch of spicy nostalgia and tongue-in-cheek quirkiness.

Dan Burn-Forti

[See his portfolio, full of commercial and personal projects]

Photographer Brice Bischoff

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Love, Photography, Pretty things, Shiny Objects by linhdy on December 7, 2010

What luck!  I’m off to vacation in New Orleans during PhotoNOLA and I simultaneously discover photographer Brice Bischoff‘s gorgeously rendered time-elapsed photography.  It helps that Bischoss has some Louisiana roots to set the mood; life could not get any better.

I’m crossing my fingers that my travel partner will surrender to my persistent pleas to participant in the Saturday art openings and maybe-just maybe-listen to the Stephen Wilkes lecture.

In the mean time, stare in wonderment at Bischoff’s Bronson Caves, a swirling haze of rainbows set amongst the earthly, cavernous wilderness.

Brice Bischoff Bronson Caves

[Photos by Brice Bischoff‘]

Irina Rozovsky

Posted in Commercial, Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Photography, Portraiture, Pretty things by linhdy on December 1, 2010

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Photos by Irina Rozovsky

Marc Garanger: Documenting Dignity

Posted in Documentary, Fine Art, Fine art, Identity, Photography, Portraiture by linhdy on November 20, 2010

In 1960, Marc Garanger was the official photographer of the French army that occupied  Algeria in 1960.  The French military forced the Algerians to build new houses around the military barracks.  As part of the occupation.  Garanger’s commanding officer ask him to photograph all the villagers for mandatory photo IDs.

In 10 days I took 2000 images. The first days the portraits I took showed the women with their veils on. When I showed the image to the commander, he asked for the veils to be removed.

The village women were photographed against their will without their veils and/or headpieces.  Garanger’s Femme Algérienne is a statement of defiance; a strong show of dignity and humanity.

Justin James King: Anything but the land

Posted in Fine Art, Landscape, Photography by linhdy on March 8, 2010

I am a big fan of landscape photography.  Photographer Justin James King gives us a new perspective of how we experience & connect with the land.  In his series And Still We Gather With Infinite Momentum, he photographs tourists as they experience the landscape– except the landscape is no where to be seen.  We’re left looking at our own experience.

Statement from King himself:

All we see when we stand in front of the landscape are archetypes: preconceived notions and pre-experienced views. Landscape is a manifestation of culture. Our perception grows out of how we have seen the landscape represented and how it has been delivered to us historically and in popular culture.

Justin James King

Justin James King

Justin James King

Lydia Panas: A study of the human condition

Posted in Family, Fine Art, Friends, Photography, Portraiture, Pretty things, Relationships by linhdy on February 8, 2010

Some human relationships cannot be summed up in words. Photographer Lydia Panas explores human relationships with quiet, personal photos depicting friends, family members, and other people she knows who are willing give her a glimpse their world.

In her series, the Mark of Abel many of her subjects pose against a natural, forest background. Her photos make use of a short depth of field– and are anything but cheesy. I can’t help but think of Diane Arbus in more ways than one.

Maybe one day all of us will be lucky enough to be captured with such a delicate, subtle eye.

Aimee Lubczanski and Her Sister

Aimee Lubczanski and Her Sister

Invincible

Invincible

Vicki and Antonio, Veronica and Sabine

Vicki and Antonio, Veronica and Sabine

Linger

Linger

It's a Matter of Perspective, Mr.President

It's a Matter of Perspective, Mr.President

Mother

Mother

Asha and Oksana W.

Asha and Oksana W.

Read an interview with Panas. Explore other blog entries.