Something like love

Photographer Dan Burn-Forti

Posted in Commercial, Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on December 15, 2010

Tweeted about him last week, not it’s time to show-off the best holiday photos from Dan Burn-Forti.  It’s so modern-day, Americana with a touch of spicy nostalgia and tongue-in-cheek quirkiness.

Dan Burn-Forti

[See his portfolio, full of commercial and personal projects]

Photographer Brice Bischoff

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Love, Photography, Pretty things, Shiny Objects by linhdy on December 7, 2010

What luck!  I’m off to vacation in New Orleans during PhotoNOLA and I simultaneously discover photographer Brice Bischoff‘s gorgeously rendered time-elapsed photography.  It helps that Bischoss has some Louisiana roots to set the mood; life could not get any better.

I’m crossing my fingers that my travel partner will surrender to my persistent pleas to participant in the Saturday art openings and maybe-just maybe-listen to the Stephen Wilkes lecture.

In the mean time, stare in wonderment at Bischoff’s Bronson Caves, a swirling haze of rainbows set amongst the earthly, cavernous wilderness.

Brice Bischoff Bronson Caves

[Photos by Brice Bischoff‘]

John Divola – Artist Lecture

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Lecutre, Photography, Relationships by linhdy on December 6, 2010

I was extremely excited to listen to the very influential photographer John Divola lecture on Sunday at the downtown Museum of Contemporary Art.  Despite the lack of ventilation in the stuffy Ahmanson Auditorium, Divola plowed through an hour-long lecture on his artwork dating from his humble beginnings as a graduate student at the University of Califorian in Los Angeles to his current work as he continues to teach photography at the University of California in Riverside.  He appeared very relaxed speaking in front the intimate crowd, no surprise coming from a professor.

The most interesting part of any artist lecture, is hearing and seeing the artist talk about their work and the evolution of their art as their thought process changes.  From Divola’s older work up until his most recent was very consistent in his exploration how humankind interacts with the natural environment and his constant exploration of the abandoned spaces, the spaces around him and man-made elements within the landscape.

Even to this day, I will still recall how my photography professor showed us his Isolated Houses series– we all looked on in silent.  Divola has an instinctual eye for light and how it shapes the subject matter, and to this day, I still believe his house series is one of his most beautiful for its play on light and color.

In Artificial Nature, Divola selects and exhibits found photographs of fake natural landscapes created for movies.  At first appearing natural and eerie, the movie sets are gorgeous.  Once the viewer takes a closer look and notices the movie set signs and the painted background, the whole gig is up.

john-divola-artificial-nature

Irina Rozovsky

Posted in Commercial, Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Photography, Portraiture, Pretty things by linhdy on December 1, 2010

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky

Photos by Irina Rozovsky

Bernard Faucon and the Modern Photograph

Posted in Fine Art, Landscape, Love, Photography, Pretty things by linhdy on November 15, 2010

Just got back from a wonderful Bernard Faucon lecture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with my wonderfully talented artist-friend Rosemary Winn (check out her work, she is amazing).

Faucon is a French artist who originally started painting before, in his own words,  realizing he had no talent and moved on to photography.  Faucon’s photographic works have themes of love, beauty and his personal favorite– childhood. Much of his photographic works explore the idyllic time of youth, sublime love and childhood dreams.

Earlier photographs explore these themes using mannequins engaged in some child-like activity, setup, scene or narrative.  As he got older, he starting photographing more conceptually like in Winter and Golden Rooms or their antithesis The Rooms of Love.

Faucon moved further away from photography in his series The Scriptures in which he built wooden words, staked them in various landscapes and photographed them with a strong flash; the words take on a ethereal quality, appearing to float above the ground.  These photos were less about the photograph and more about the words and thoughts themselves.

Finally, The End of the Image marks his last official project in photography.  These are exhibited as small photographs with powerful, poignant phrases painted on youthful skins.

Faucon led the audience from his earlier train of thought using staged photography to finally his disillusionment with staged photography.  He raises an interesting idea.  Paraphrasing his words, with the ubiquity of photography, everyone is taking photographs of everything.  “All the photographs have been taken…” There is no further need to photograph.

Instead, the artist becomes the person who selects the photograph.  For Faucon, the voice that makes a difference is the person who selects and who lends his/her perspective to the work.  And that, my friend, is why he no longer photographs.

Take a look at some of his stunning work below.  His voice is an artist’s voice that has expressed beautiful ideas.  As Faucon says, “You cannot get over the fact that it should come to an end…”

Bernard Faucon - The Probable Evolution of Time

See more of Faucon’s works at Gallery Vu.

[Images from The Probable Evolution of Time by Bernard Faucon]

Justin James King: Anything but the land

Posted in Fine Art, Landscape, Photography by linhdy on March 8, 2010

I am a big fan of landscape photography.  Photographer Justin James King gives us a new perspective of how we experience & connect with the land.  In his series And Still We Gather With Infinite Momentum, he photographs tourists as they experience the landscape– except the landscape is no where to be seen.  We’re left looking at our own experience.

Statement from King himself:

All we see when we stand in front of the landscape are archetypes: preconceived notions and pre-experienced views. Landscape is a manifestation of culture. Our perception grows out of how we have seen the landscape represented and how it has been delivered to us historically and in popular culture.

Justin James King

Justin James King

Justin James King