Something like love

John Divola – Artist Lecture

Posted in Fine Art, Fine art, Landscape, Lecutre, Photography, Relationships by linhdy on December 6, 2010

I was extremely excited to listen to the very influential photographer John Divola lecture on Sunday at the downtown Museum of Contemporary Art.  Despite the lack of ventilation in the stuffy Ahmanson Auditorium, Divola plowed through an hour-long lecture on his artwork dating from his humble beginnings as a graduate student at the University of Califorian in Los Angeles to his current work as he continues to teach photography at the University of California in Riverside.  He appeared very relaxed speaking in front the intimate crowd, no surprise coming from a professor.

The most interesting part of any artist lecture, is hearing and seeing the artist talk about their work and the evolution of their art as their thought process changes.  From Divola’s older work up until his most recent was very consistent in his exploration how humankind interacts with the natural environment and his constant exploration of the abandoned spaces, the spaces around him and man-made elements within the landscape.

Even to this day, I will still recall how my photography professor showed us his Isolated Houses series– we all looked on in silent.  Divola has an instinctual eye for light and how it shapes the subject matter, and to this day, I still believe his house series is one of his most beautiful for its play on light and color.

In Artificial Nature, Divola selects and exhibits found photographs of fake natural landscapes created for movies.  At first appearing natural and eerie, the movie sets are gorgeous.  Once the viewer takes a closer look and notices the movie set signs and the painted background, the whole gig is up.

john-divola-artificial-nature

Marina Abramovic – Pushing the Envelope of Performance

Posted in Fine Art, Identity, Moving, Portraiture, Relationships by linhdy on December 2, 2010

Marina Abramovicis what I would call a radical performance artist.  She has shaped performance art in ways that I will not even try to explain.  However, I will admit that I used to think performance art was annoying, obnoxious and incomprehendable but now Abramovic has helped me view this medium in a new (more positive) light.

marina-abramovic-kitchenI-homagetosaintterese

marina-abramovic-stromboli-pieta

marina abramovic the family ix

Read more at the Sean Kelly Gallery, learn about her In The Family project or read the New York Press.

 

Robyn Cumming: The mystery

Posted in Fine Art, Photography, Pretty things, Relationships by linhdy on February 27, 2010

Whenever a photographer or artist obscures the face– it leaves me with a very unsettling feeling. But at the same time, I can’t take my eyes away. I think I am subconsciously looking for that face, or a sign.

Anyway, here are some quirky mysteries to marvel at…

Robyn Cumming
Robyn Cumming
Robyn Cumming

Check out her website, see a snapshot, or look at her gallery at The Morning News.

Willeke Duijvekam: The life of Eva

Posted in Family, Identity, Photography, Portraiture, Pretty things, Relationships by linhdy on February 18, 2010

The turning point of a new year always brings about the Best of lists– and I love it. What better way to celebrate 2009 than to review everything that was good, bad & ugly?

The World Press summed up their photography section with a gallery of the best of the best. I was particularly drawn to the Netherland’s photographer Willeke Duijvekam, who came in 3rd place in the portrait section!

The project follows the life of Eva, an adolescent who is living with a gender identity disorder. Unfortunately, the website is another language– so I can’t really explain any further than that…but let’s just say the photos speak for themselves…





Lydia Panas: A study of the human condition

Posted in Family, Fine Art, Friends, Photography, Portraiture, Pretty things, Relationships by linhdy on February 8, 2010

Some human relationships cannot be summed up in words. Photographer Lydia Panas explores human relationships with quiet, personal photos depicting friends, family members, and other people she knows who are willing give her a glimpse their world.

In her series, the Mark of Abel many of her subjects pose against a natural, forest background. Her photos make use of a short depth of field– and are anything but cheesy. I can’t help but think of Diane Arbus in more ways than one.

Maybe one day all of us will be lucky enough to be captured with such a delicate, subtle eye.

Aimee Lubczanski and Her Sister

Aimee Lubczanski and Her Sister

Invincible

Invincible

Vicki and Antonio, Veronica and Sabine

Vicki and Antonio, Veronica and Sabine

Linger

Linger

It's a Matter of Perspective, Mr.President

It's a Matter of Perspective, Mr.President

Mother

Mother

Asha and Oksana W.

Asha and Oksana W.

Read an interview with Panas. Explore other blog entries.